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20130224
20130224
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
'll debate that on our powerhouse roundtable. >>> but first, some facts. pentagon will take the biggest hit from the cuts. president obama warned of dire consequences yesterday. >> the threat of these cuts has forced the navy to delay the deployment of an aircraft carrier to the persian gulf. affecting our ability to respond to threats in an unstable part of the world. just this week, the pentagon announced that, if these cuts go through, almost 800,000 defense employees, the equivalent of every person in miami and cleveland combined, will be forced to take an unpaid leave. >> and with that, let's take the debate to our first roundtable. headlined be i the chairman of the house intelligence committee, mike rogers of michigan. lead democrat on the house foreign affairs committee eric engel and our own george will and christiane amanpour. >> the impact on the national security, there is no doubt. there's some misnomers. only 2 cents on the dollar over the whole federal budget. that's in seven months and highlighted, put at least most of the burden on the defense department. that's going to ha
is in october. so it's a lot of money in a short amount of time, and it will affect pentagon workers, and they've made a point, they're going to have to be furloughed a day a week beginning inapril. you are going to probably have individual stories of hurt and pain, the family that saved up for a vacation and shows up at a national park, two kids in the backseat, and it's closed. that's what happened during the government shutdown. it's stories like that that can go viral. you are going to have kids turned away from headstart because they can't afford to cover that many people. but it's not all going to be felt in one day. and frankly, people are so cynical about government and government spending that most people think, you know, either the politicians are going to solve this at the last minute, or it is not going to matter anyway. so you haven't -- the president has tried to gin up an emotional reaction in the country among his supporters, and i don't think that's really happened. >> to add to that, only 44 billion of the 85 billion in cuts will go into effect in 2013, amounting to about 0.6
of the world. just this week, the pentagon announced that, if these cuts go through, almost 800,000 defense employees, the equivalent of every person in miami and cleveland combined, will be forced to take an unpaid leave. >> and with that, let's take the debate to our first roundtable. headlined be i the chairman of the house intelligence committee, mike rogers of michigan. lead democrat on the house foreign affairs committee eric engel and our own george will and christiane amanpour. >> the impact on the national security, there is no doubt. there's some misnomers. only 2 cents on the dollar over the whole federal budget. that's in seven months and highlighted, put at least most of the burden on the defense department. that's going to have an impact. that's a 13% cut. the best way to get through this, i mean, we can point fingers. the best way to do this is to allow flexibility. if you allow flexibility -- you don't have to shut down -- >> i wanted to bring that to congressman engel. >> i think the sequester was a stupid thing. i voted against it when it first time it came up.
-minute negotiations and each says the other is playing politics. the pentagon would take a major hit. senator john mccain says today that the impact on the military would be unconscionable and could mean longer tours of duty for troops in afghanistan. the nation's governors, democrat and republican, anticipate possible economic effects in their states. >> all of this is a concern for our respective states, if they do nothing or what the alternatives could be. are starting to comeifficult out of it and it is getting better and unfortunately the sequester could put us right back where we were. >> the sequester takes effect march 1 unless congress takes action to stop it so far, no action. >> no action? no one talking to each other? what a surprise. >>heather: think the budget battles in washington, dc will not hit you in the government warning now that if sequestration occurs it could mean a furlough of meat inspection workers which could cause trouble at the meat market. >> politics could get in the way of being able to eat the foods we like to eat. >> if this happens, the prices could go up a little
department after getting in a little bit of hot water after saying the pentagon was treating manning unfairly. three years later, what are your thoughts on him now? >> for a caveat, the formal trial has not begun, but there is a legal proceeding under way, you know, regarding the charges and a potential, you know, plea-bargain. so this is a very open and transparent legal process, so it's not as if he's being held without charge. that said, obviously, two years ago i was concerned that it was punitive confinement at quantico. eventually the army moved him to ft. leavenworth, and he received more suitable pretrial confinement which is consistent with, you know, our norps both in the military and civilian justice system. he stands accused of very serious crimes, and the legal case will get under way late they are spring. >> p.j. crowley, always a pleasure. thanks. >> all right, alex. >> still ahead, manti te'o meets the press. how did he handle the barrage of questions about that infamous hoax? ♪ [ male announcer ] were you more interesting in your twenties, or now? when you were starting out
there's so many installations of military and defense workers. the pentagon noted more than 700,000 civilian military workers, department of defense workers, will effectively lose 20% of their pay. they will have to work one less day a week if this goes in effect. as one observer put it, it's like a low speed car crash heading our way. >> peter alexander from 1600. peter, thank you, sir. >>> wednesday morning the supreme court will hear arguments in a case called shelby county versus holder. it's a case that could determine the future of the landmark voting rights act of 1965. to find out what's at stake, we're going to go ahead and take a reality check on this sunday. peter bacon an msnbc contributor and editor of the grio. let's start at the beginning, if you will, for folks not following the story perhaps. what's at stake here on wednesday? >> the key thing at stake here is this is a law -- this is 1965, that lays out basically for a lot of southern states, states that had a history of discrimination, they had -- the big portion is they have to usually pre-clear any law about
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)

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